To NAS or not to NAS, that is the question.

Yes! Being horribly behind the times has worked in my favor once again - now I know which drives not to buy. So, much like @Dave was two years ago, I'm out of space on my current media drive, and I need to increase my capacity, run everything through the Plex or VLC interfaces to stream to TV my Chromecast, and provide file storage and backup capacity for our website. Is NAS the right route, or do I need something more like the full-blown server like Gas had for running Empyrion?
 

GasBandit

Staff member
If you want to run Plex, you're going to need a PC. It doesn't necessarily have to be server-grade (though, I bought my server for like $240).

So really, you could just get the cheapest PC you can find and stick some USB drives in it.

But, on the other hand, you could just use NAS storage, and run VideoStream for chrome on your regular PC, and map its libraries to the shared storage. That's what I was doing before I got my server.
 
If you want to run Plex, you're going to need a PC. It doesn't necessarily have to be server-grade (though, I bought my server for like $240).

So really, you could just get the cheapest PC you can find and stick some USB drives in it.
Perfect. Cheapest PC I can find and USB drives is right in my price range.
 
If you want to run Plex, you're going to need a PC. It doesn't necessarily have to be server-grade (though, I bought my server for like $240).

So really, you could just get the cheapest PC you can find and stick some USB drives in it.

But, on the other hand, you could just use NAS storage, and run VideoStream for chrome on your regular PC, and map its libraries to the shared storage. That's what I was doing before I got my server.
My TerraMaster F4-220 runs "Terra-Master TOS" as the controller/configuration shell. It's linux-based and will run plex, so I was able to move my plex instance over to it. So, you don't technically need a full pc if you're getting a NAS device that'll run plex.
 
I also want to put in that if you know how to read spec sheets (UDIMM v RDIMM, PCI v PCIe v PCI-X, etc), you can find some reasonably good deals (dimes on the dollar) at places like discountelectronics.com, LabGopher.com, ServerMonkey.com, etc.

--Patrick
 
Thanks. Money probably isn't going to be a massive issue with this purchase, because we should be getting a rather large infusion of cash shortly, but a penny saved is like 50 pennies earned these days, so I'll probably take some time to pick through deals as much as I can, right up until I get too frustrated and just go online and buy the rest of the hardware in one fell swoop. What I'm looking for here is at least 32GB of RAM (and as capacity goes up, speed going down is fine), a decent processor, and more hard drives and fans than I know what to do with, yes?
 
What I'm looking for here is at least 32GB of RAM (and as capacity goes up, speed going down is fine), a decent processor, and more hard drives and fans than I know what to do with, yes?
RAM speed probably doesn't matter as much for NAS/Plex function, it's the amount that's important. I would try to stay at 16GB or above. Usually it's not the CPU, etc that really drive up the price, it's the purchase of 5x8TB (or whatever) drives that really tacks on the $$$, especially since they need to be built to handle the transmitted vibration(s) from other drives in the system.
Some other advice:
-DO NOT get a machine whose CPU lacks AES-NI support. Just don't. For one thing, it'll make encryption/decryption MUCH faster if you use it, and the other thing is that you probably don't want to use any CPU so old it doesn't support it anyway.
-Get ECC memory if you plan to use the machine for NAS, it reduces the risk of data corruption.
-Try to balance the hardware choices against how much you will be using it. If you are going to be leaving it running 24/7, you're going to want to skip the 130W CPUs and pick more energy-efficient parts and/or remove/disable anything you're not going to use.

I spent the last year digging about NAS and ZFS, so I could go on for quite a while about this, obviously.

--Patrick
 
Just an FYI for anyone else who, like myself, is thinking of going the "roll-your-own" route for building a NAS machine. Later this year, when the free and Open Source NAS package "FreeNAS" moves from v11.x to v12, it will also be changing name from "FreeNAS" to "TrueNAS CORE." They promise that this is more about unifying the brand and it will still be 100% free, still Open Source, and it will not result in any "Nerfing" of its functionality. Additionally, it looks like they are trying to move to something of an OS-independent model though "TrueNAS SCALE," which is (I guess?) a version they have running atop Debian to allow for a more Linux-friendly package.

--Patrick
 
This time, the issue has been resolved by the simple answer of "when I ordered the parts for Aislynn's new computer, I got a free 2TB WD Green SSD, which I will now be adding to my system as a second storage drive."
 

Dave

Staff member
So Pat. If YOU were to pick out a mid-ranged NAS and drives. And that NAS had to support Plex.

What would you choose?
 
What would you choose?
Well, I'm cheap (AND I honestly don't know that much about Plex), so I'd probably just download the Plex plug-in for FreeNAS, since one exists and I already have a box set up running FreeNAS.

BUT if I wanted a more turnkey NAS that I knew would support Plex out of the box AND had some room to grow? One that prioritized the goal of storing and consuming media above that of long-term archival storage? I'm guessing it would probably come down to a choice between one made by Synology or QNAP. Only problem is, since SOHO boxes usually ship with anemic processors, transcoding 4K footage is going to be an issue. Some of them have built-in hardware assistance, but that's something that will only work with whichever specific codecs are built into the hardware, meaning if your device requests any codec that's not built in, it might stutter or just drop out entirely. Not a big problem right now, but HEVC/H.265 is growing in popularity, and will no doubt replace H.264 someday. Also, turns out the version of Plex that supports hardware transcoding costs extra money anyway.

THEREFORE I would choose one whose processor is capable of transcoding in software, since all it takes to add new codecs in software is just to update that software. I would also pick a NAS that's relatively new so that it's not in danger of being discontinued/unsupported any time soon. Consulting the Plex people's compatibility list, there are not very many that can decode 4K UHD HDR in software. In fact, there are only three, all made by QNAP:

QNAP TS-877-1700 (Ryzen 7 1700) - US$2500
QNAP TVS-882BRT3-i7 (Core i7-7700) - US$2700
QNAP TVS-1282T/1282T3-i5/i7 (Core i5-7500/i7-7700) - US$3700-4500

These prices are all without any drives installed, by the way. Clearly, if I want something I can actually afford, the solution is either going to be to noticeably lower my standards, or else roll my own. But since this is an exercise in choosing an off-the-shelf solution, I will continue to ignore the DIY side of things. So how low can I go? A quick check of the ones that can decode 4K UHD SDR still puts those at or near US$2000, but I'm looking for something closer to $1500* (or lower), so it looks like we're going to be looking only at the ones that say they can do 1080p in software. Hardware assist would be nice, but again since it is an extra cost (to upgrade Plex), I will not consider it essential.

Most people have sizable libraries of media, so I will also not even look at any NAS with less than 4 bays, preferably not less than 6. I'm also not going to consider any NAS that only ranks "some" in software decoding of 1080p. It must be a full "yes."

Ah, now we're getting into the sub-US$1000's-ish. Again, sticking with only the models on the Plex list:

Asustor AS-4004T - US$450 - Wow what a price!
QNAP TVS-473e - US$1050 - BUT...
QNAP TVS-673e - US$1100 - Same as the above but you get 2 add'l bays for under $100 more.

Pretty much every other NAS in the list was either too expensive, didn't have enough bays, was too old, or got passed over for some other reason. I really wasn't expecting to narrow the list down to so few, and I was expecting there to be more of a fight between models from Synology and QNAP, but either the Plex people just haven't tested enough Synology NASes yet, or else Synology's lineup is too focused on business use instead of SOHO/Personal.

So based on all this, I guess the QNAP TVS-673e is the one to compare everything else against, with the Asustor as a dark horse competitor based solely on its remarkably low price. There is the VERY REAL possibility that manufacturers have released newer models that have not yet made it into the Plex compatibility list, and that I therefore could not compare. If so, check their hardware specs against other similar models that are on the Plex list to get some idea what they're capable of. One NAS with a Core i7-7700 performs much like any other with the same processor, and in the case where the CPU has been upgraded or changed in the newer model, there are sites like Passmark's CPU pages where you can estimate how much difference the new CPU might make.

--Patrick
*I know I said I'm going to avoid the DIY method, but once the price goes noticeably over $1500, it REALLY starts to make more sense to roll your own if you don't need integrated hardware.
 
incidentally, for what it's worth, when I rip CDs to the library, I use Handbrake (a free tool) to transcode it into a Roku-friendly format so no transcoding work is necessary by my TerraMaster
 
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