Space stuff (NASA, UKSA, CSA, ESA, etc)

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Probably earlier, if you count static electricity.

—Patrick
I had also realized that failed attempts to start a fire - or even just some Neanderthal smashing two rocks together for fun - would have manufactured a spark of light, too.
 
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Namesake of the eponymous "Thagomizer?"
I love that archeopaleontologists have more or less agreed to use that term for that part of the stegosaurus and am somewhat astonished they didn't already have a term for it.
 

Dave

Staff member
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Interstellar object may have been alien probe, Harvard paper argues, but experts are skeptical

Um...Experts are skeptical, but the lead authors on the paper are ALSO experts.

"The paper was written by Abraham Loeb, professor and chair of astronomy, and Shmuel Bialy, a postdoctoral scholar, at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Loeb has published four books and more than 700 papers on topics like black holes, the future of the universe, the search for extraterrestrial life and the first stars."
 
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Interstellar object may have been alien probe, Harvard paper argues, but experts are skeptical

Um...Experts are skeptical, but the lead authors on the paper are ALSO experts.

"The paper was written by Abraham Loeb, professor and chair of astronomy, and Shmuel Bialy, a postdoctoral scholar, at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Loeb has published four books and more than 700 papers on topics like black holes, the future of the universe, the search for extraterrestrial life and the first stars."
Y'know... if I were an alien race that wanted to finally come out of the darkness, but do it in the most chaotic way possible, I could see instilling a puppet President in one of the largest world powers so that no one will believe the government when they tell people that aliens are starting to attack being a good strategy.


/tinfoil
 
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Y'know... if I were an alien race that wanted to finally come out of the darkness, but do it in the most chaotic way possible, I could see instilling a puppet President in one of the largest world powers so that no one will believe the government when they tell people that aliens are starting to attack being a good strategy.


/tinfoil
 
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One of the requirements of a "moon" is that it will sweep up and incorporate other nearby matter with its gravity. These clouds must be too far away for our moon to have slurped them in, while simultaneously not having enough mutual attraction to pull themselves together into a single, cohesive satellite.

Many people believe our moon was formed by a massive impact (also giving Earth its 23deg list), so now I'm wondering whether these clouds are also debris from that impact, or whether they're just collections of dust gathered where they are simply because they are in the "doldrums" of those Lagrange points.

--Patrick
 
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NASA made their version of an Apple video.
...with Mike Rowe (instead of Richard Dreyfuss) but don't care. NASA needs to hurry up. The sooner we have alternatives, the better.


--Patrick
 
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First Picture from NASA's InSight Martian Lander, immediately after landing on the red planet:


Welcome to Mars, NASA Insight. Yesterday NASA's robotic spacecraft InSight made a dramatic landing on Mars after a six-month trek across the inner Solar System. Needing to brake from 20,000 km per hour to zero in about seven minutes, Insight decelerated by as much as 8 g's and heated up to 1500 degrees Celsius as it deployed a heat shield, a parachute, and at the end, rockets. The featured image was the first taken by InSight on Mars, and welcome proof that the spacecraft had shed enough speed to land softly and function on the red planet. During its final descent, InSight's rockets kicked up dust which can be seen stuck to the lens cap of the Instrument Context Camera. Past the spotty dirt, parts of the lander that are visible include cover bolts at the bottom and a lander footpad on the lower right. Small rocks are visible across the rusty red soil, while the arc across the top of the image is the Martian horizon dividing land and sky. Over the next few weeks InSight will deploy several scientific instruments, including a rumble-detecting seismometer. These instruments are expected to give humanity unprecedented data involving the interior of Mars, a region thought to harbor formation clues not only about Mars, but Earth. (NASA Astronomy Pic of the Day)

Now that the lens cap has been removed:

(Gizmodo)
 
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