I hate Windows 10

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#1
I purposely don't update, do everything to stop updates.

This morning, it said "YOU MUST" essentially. I let it happen, hated everything it changed, and so set it back to the previous version. I thought that would be enough.
But now it's giving me the same message as this morning. So it's insisting on this update. It suggests it won't do it unless it restarts, but sometimes after putting it to sleep, it restarts on its own.

What can I do to stop updates forever?
 
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#2
I purposely don't update, do everything to stop updates.

This morning, it said "YOU MUST" essentially. I let it happen, hated everything it changed, and so set it back to the previous version. I thought that would be enough.
But now it's giving me the same message as this morning. So it's insisting on this update. It suggests it won't do it unless it restarts, but sometimes after putting it to sleep, it restarts on its own.

What can I do to stop updates forever?
Depending on what version you are on, you may be able to set your internet connection to metered. That will stop it from automatically downloading the updates. Outside of that, Microsoft says "fuck you we say when you update" unless you drop $200 to buy the professional license
 
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#3
What he said. Win10 is free...as long as you agree to always update. It's good because at least people get security patches on time. It's bad because...well, everything else.
 
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#4
Depending on what version you are on, you may be able to set your internet connection to metered. That will stop it from automatically downloading the updates. Outside of that, Microsoft says "fuck you we say when you update" unless you drop $200 to buy the professional license
I have mine metered.

It's trying to install the April 2018 one; I just hate it.
 

figmentPez

Staff member
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#5
What about it do you hate? It might be possible to have the update, but reconfigure it to behave more like you want.
 
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#6
What about it do you hate? It might be possible to have the update, but reconfigure it to behave more like you want.
It makes my audio and airplane mode buttons stop working. It turns Cortana back on. It changes visual elements I don't have names for. It modifies theme elements for no apparent reason. It switches privacy settings so Microsoft can put its dirty fingers into my computer.

I can fix most of this but I shouldn't have to. It's my computer, I'm not tech illiterate. I can make these decisions for myself.

But from what I'm learning here, the goal is to inconvenience me as much as possible until I shell out $200.
 
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#8
the goal is to inconvenience me as much as possible until I shell out $200.
In reality, the goal is to force people who normally procrastinate indefinitely about updating their computers to "get their shots," essentially nanny state-ing herd immunity for worms, viruses, etc. for as long as their hardware configuration is supported. Microsoft is more forgiving for the professional version because the assumption is that your IT dept will ensure you get your required updates. As for support:

WinX.png


[source for above image]

...in other words, it's a sort of "For your own good" on the part of Microsoft, but yes, it means that people who are clinging to a particular version (for whatever reason) are eventually going to get left behind. Also, hardware/software manufacturers are unlikely to ensure compatibility with older versions of WinX, so you will always eventually reach a point where you either MUST update or else be forced to stick with legacy versions of your favorite app or whatever.

Just be careful with this (and other, similar) tools, as they frequently allow you access to options that turn off modules you might actually need. Keep track of what you change in case you need to revert it.

--Patrick
 
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#9
In reality, the goal is to force people who normally procrastinate indefinitely about updating their computers to "get their shots," essentially nanny state-ing herd immunity for worms, viruses, etc. for as long as their hardware configuration is supported. Microsoft is more forgiving for the professional version because the assumption is that your IT dept will ensure you get your required updates. As for support:

View attachment 31585

[source for above image]

...in other words, it's a sort of "For your own good" on the part of Microsoft, but yes, it means that people who are clinging to a particular version (for whatever reason) are eventually going to get left behind. Also, hardware/software manufacturers are unlikely to ensure compatibility with older versions of WinX, so you will always eventually reach a point where you either MUST update or else be forced to stick with legacy versions of your favorite app or whatever.


Just be careful with this (and other, similar) tools, as they frequently allow you access to options that turn off modules you might actually need. Keep track of what you change in case you need to revert it.

--Patrick

The truly unfortunate thing is that the Microsoft nanny-state is terrible at what they do. The updates are almost always filled with bloatware, microsoft extras that they want to worm onto your machine, or sometimes are just the wrong software. I once spent 30 minutes fighting with windows because it kept automatically downloading THE WRONG DRIVERS to one specialized peripheral after I would load the correct, most recent, straight from the manufacturer drivers for it, only to have it work briefly before windows said "oh lemme update that for you."

The nanny-state is bloated and not always in our best interest. It's nothing more than Microsoft tyranny, I should be able to do with my system wh- wait, did I just become libertarian? No one tell @GasBandit
 
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#10
The nanny-state is bloated and not always in our best interest. It's nothing more than Microsoft tyranny, I should be able to do with my system wh- wait, did I just become libertarian? No one tell @GasBandit
Where else you gonna go? Apple, with their thousand dollar monitor stands? Linux, where they're trying to ram systemd down everyone's throat?

The only question is whose yoke you're gonna be tied to.
 
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#11
I left the computer unplugged and in airplane mode last night and when I woke it up this morning, the updater got an error message and went away.

I guess I'll just have to leave it this way, which is fine since my phone is my internet mostly.
 
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#12
Microsoft, Apple, Linux. And Linux is beholden to both Bill and Steve - even more to Steve. Choose wisely.
 
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#14
Linux and AppleOS are both beholden to Ken Thompson, since both were based on Unix
Linux is more beholden to Lennart Poettering these days, thanks to Pulse Audio and systemd. Which makes him nearly as hated as Bill.
 
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#15
The truly unfortunate thing is that the Microsoft nanny-state is terrible at what they do.
Where else you gonna go? Apple, with their thousand dollar monitor stands? Linux, where they're trying to ram systemd down everyone's throat?

The only question is whose yoke you're gonna be tied to.
Microsoft: "Logic clearly dictates the needs of the many* outweigh the needs of the few. (Or the one)"
Apple: "You may find that having is not so pleasing a thing as wanting. This is not logical, but it is often true.”
Linux: (re: systemd) "If there are self-made purgatories, then we all have to live in them."

--Patrick
*And the Microsoft...
 
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#16
Never mind.

Windows was like "Oops : ( you have to restart! Darn!" So it forcibly crashed my computer and made it restart, so now the update's installed again, and Cortana is back, and my fonts look weird, and on and on.

Sigh.
 
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#17
Never mind.

Windows was like "Oops : ( you have to restart! Darn!" So it forcibly crashed my computer and made it restart, so now the update's installed again, and Cortana is back, and my fonts look weird, and on and on.

Sigh.
And you're still at least one major update behind.
 
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#19
Maybe that update will make it so Times New Roman doesn't look all screwed up in Microsoft Word, which this update has caused.
I don't know about that, but the latest one somehow fixed the Microsoft Store app that somehow broke a couple weeks after I installed the system.
 

figmentPez

Staff member
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#21
Maybe that update will make it so Times New Roman doesn't look all screwed up in Microsoft Word, which this update has caused.
Hmm, I wonder if running the ClearType Text Tuner would help.

It's also likely that your video card drivers got reverted to an old version.
 
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#22
What I'm not quite understanding is why I have Version 1803 Build 17134.799 of 10 at the moment...
 
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#23
Hmm, I wonder if running the ClearType Text Tuner would help.

It's also likely that your video card drivers got reverted to an old version.
I updated the video drivers; didn't help.
Zooming in to 120% helps a bit, but I'll try ClearType sometime this week.
 
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#25
Linux, where they're trying to ram systemd down everyone's throat?
I do NOT understand the hate for systemd. I've tried to look into why it's so hated, and my analysis basically came down to "I'm upset that my scripts that I've been tweaking for 10 (or 20, or 30) years I can't tweak anymore because it's not looking for that obscure .config file in that weird 3-letter-named 5-deep subdirectory anymore! How can anybody understand this weird new configuration???"

It's an actual system layer that you can rely on for a number of normal low-level system services. Like logging. And querying if things are running. Yes pretty much everything has to hook in to it in SOME way. But it's a move in the right direction, rather than the bailing-wire and twine that has usually been keeping Linux/Unix systems "together" for the last 40+ years.

But this is from somebody outside the ecosystem looking in. Please give a better explanation that doesn't portray the systemd people (or anybody who dares associate with them) into The Syndicate or something.
 
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#26
Please give a better explanation that doesn't portray the systemd people (or anybody who dares associate with them) into The Syndicate or something.
My assumption is that since systemd might as well be middleware, anyone who uses it is effectively creating dependencies against code over which they have no control, and which might later come back to bite them if systemd changes enough to throw off their code, sort of like .Net or Java or your garden variety firmware blob.

—Patrick
 
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