Full hard brexit. But at least its red white and blue.

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#2
To be fair, for the Brexit to have any significant point as far as "control over borders/immigration" is concerned, you kind of need a hard Brexit. I mean, it's stupid and destructive, but yeah, that's what the people voted for. A Norway-like trade deal would mean less independence, not more.
 
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#4
My oh my how far the stupids have come.

Wait? Does that still make them stupid, or is it a stupids in high numbers thing?
 

Dave

Staff member
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#5
The only thing that fits both here and in the Trump thread:

:facepalm:
 
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#11
Believe it or not, this is one of the reasons I haven't gotten FM17. I usually play as an English team, and the prospect of having a huge chunk of the international transfer market cut off from me pretty much makes me not want to play.
My co-workers are really into Football Manager, and one of them is in the same boat as you.
 
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#13
Are English football teams unaware of work visas?
How visa will work between EU and UK is still very much up in the air and , certainly at first, will not be all that easy. After all, too many foreigners coming to work is exactly why they wanted out.
 
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#14
Are English football teams unaware of work visas?
Assuming the visa rules for EU footballers are the same as the current rules for non-EU players any player UK clubs want to sign will need to have played in 30 - 75% of their national team's matches over the past 2 years (depending on FIFA ranking for that country). So that teenager who your scout tells you will be one of the top players in the world in a few years, but hasn't quite broken through yet? Not eligible for a visa. Neither is the player who picked up an injury just before the World Cup & was left out of his country's squad & as a result hasn't played in enough international's over the last 2 years. Or that German player who is better than the players you currently have, but isn't quite good enough for the German national team.
 
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#17
government loses appeal, vote on article 50 to go ahead

well, thats good! theresa may was arguing that cabinet have the right to start the shitshow rolling without direct approval from parliament, which is hilarious/depressing/hilapressing? given the whole "SOVRNTY NOW FUCK BRUSSLS" bollocks. we might be able to get out of this alri-

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn says his party will not "frustrate" the process for invoking Article 50.
oh god damn it. still its not like labour previously said that hard brexit was their limit, and they wouldnt support it.

oh. bugger.
 
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#19
government loses appeal, vote on article 50 to go ahead

well, thats good! theresa may was arguing that cabinet have the right to start the shitshow rolling without direct approval from parliament, which is hilarious/depressing/hilapressing? given the whole "SOVRNTY NOW FUCK BRUSSLS" bollocks. we might be able to get out of this alri-



oh god damn it. still its not like labour previously said that hard brexit was their limit, and they wouldnt support it.

oh. bugger.
Nobody dares to say "the people fucked up, we probably oughtn't do this". Same with the US electoral college :awesome:
 
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#20
oh god damn it. still its not like labour previously said that hard brexit was their limit, and they wouldnt support it.

oh. bugger.
To be fair, invoking A50 and negotiating a hard brexit are different things.

Then again, i don't see how you can really leave the EU while staying in the common market...
 
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#22
TIL, Norway used to be in the EU.

What i meant is, the EU will be in a much stronger position to negotiate the UK's re-entry in the common market once Brexit is over, and it will be a lot better for it to do it after, because otherwise it would give others ideas.
 
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#23
TIL, Norway used to be in the EU.

What i meant is, the EU will be in a much stronger position to negotiate the UK's re-entry in the common market once Brexit is over, and it will be a lot better for it to do it after, because otherwise it would give others ideas.
The UK has made it clear they don't want a Norway deal - for obvious reasons, I think - but it just shows that it's perfectly possible to be part of one and not the other. No, they technically didn't leave - they refused to join three times - but that doesn't really change much. it's like saying that a secceeded Texas couldn't possibly keep using the Dollar, while there are plenty of independant countries who, you know, do. Are there geopolitical reasons why the EU might not want to give it to them? Sure. Either way, it's a moot point since neither side wants a Norway scenario.
 
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#26
That'd be zero, but a few British Overseas Territories do: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_dollar

It's in the header of the article. So non-USA places (they're NOT territories of the USA) but not full independent countries either.
Wrong. [/trump]

Panama, Ecuador, the Caribean Netherlands, Bermuda. Argentina did, for a while. I can't name them all by heart, really. It's not because you don't use a dollar bill that you're not using the dollar.

And for another type of example, the US Dollar is one of the few legal ways of paying in Somalia.
 
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#27
Wrong. [/trump]

Panama, Ecuador, the Caribean Netherlands, Bermuda. Argentina did, for a while. I can't name them all by heart, really. It's not because you don't use a dollar bill that you're not using the dollar.

And for another type of example, the US Dollar is one of the few legal ways of paying in Somalia.
Read fail for me on the "several countries use it as their official currency" in the article I linked.

I'm going home. Work has drained me.

Peace all.
 
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