Consensus on Windows antivirus/security suites?

Reactions
112 0 0
#1
My parents are getting new Windows laptops, and while I've been using Avast for years, I hear that it is no longer considered the best. That said, I've also heard that Norton, Kapersky and McAfee are just giant piles of bloatware, and I'm not too familiar with BitDefender or some of the others.

How vulnerable are my parents if I just tell them to keep Windows Defender on and keep their laptops updated?
 
Reactions
330 57 0
#3
I just use Windows defender and I've never had a virus. Though, I also know what not to do, which I'm pretty sure is 99% of it.
 
Reactions
201 37 1
#4
Honestly, if you're somewhat internet savvy (don't click links in e-mails that look phisy or fishy, don't click on ads on porn sites, what-have-you) and keep your internet usage normal, it's not really necessary to have a separate antivirus these days, in my opinion.
I use adblock plus and have java blocked, and use windows defender, and haven't had a virus in....errrrrr....Well, since before I started doing this, back when I had Norton. I think it's been some 8 or 9 years, at least, since I've had virus problems.
 
Reactions
112 0 0
#5
Though, I also know what not to do, which I'm pretty sure is 99% of it.
This is basically what I'm worried about.

My mom does things like share USB drives with her writing group who are all the same age because they're all working on their own novels or art-series where the files are larger than 25 MBs, and not everyone has Google Drive enabled or uses gmail.

My dad does not do any of that stuff and he knows not to click on weird things. He just goes on business trips to China.

Adblock plus and java-disable is probably the way to go, I'm just pretty sure that at some point they'll reverse the setting because some website they use told them to and never turn it back on.
 
Reactions
547 98 4
#6
Sounds more like you need to install some sort of parental controls software to keep them from changing the settings.
No antivirus is perfect, what you are mainly getting with a paid solution over something like Malwarebytes is that the paid solution is an active always-on scanner rather than waiting for someone to run it.
That said, I believe Bitdefender is probably the highest rated overall virus protection at this time.

--Patrick
 
Reactions
71 0 0
#8
I personally use Sophos Home - it's free for up to 10 computers.

Sophos is one of the better business products out there and it has a web interface to be able to set up/manage. Virus, malware, and can also be used or blocking inappropriate things (very handy for my son's computer).

https://home.sophos.com/
 

GasBandit

Staff member
Reactions
1,126 236 4
#10
Windows Defender has largely been enough for me, most of the time, only needing to break out Malwarebytes when somebody does something egregiously stupid.

If you want a good active solution, I'd recommend paying the Pro subscription fee on malwarebytes.
 
#12
I personally use Sophos Home - it's free for up to 10 computers.

Sophos is one of the better business products out there and it has a web interface to be able to set up/manage. Virus, malware, and can also be used or blocking inappropriate things (very handy for my son's computer).

https://home.sophos.com/
Saw this thread and was going to post this as well. My work uses it and it is highly effective. You can setup how you want it to work and best of all, it is free.
 
Reactions
180 2 0
#13
This is basically what I'm worried about.

My mom does things like share USB drives with her writing group who are all the same age because they're all working on their own novels or art-series where the files are larger than 25 MBs, and not everyone has Google Drive enabled or uses gmail.

My dad does not do any of that stuff and he knows not to click on weird things. He just goes on business trips to China.

Adblock plus and java-disable is probably the way to go, I'm just pretty sure that at some point they'll reverse the setting because some website they use told them to and never turn it back on.
Have you considered a chrome book or windows S? They're highly restrictive environments. Windows S limits you to only running UWP apps from their store, but you could upgrade to windows 10 proper if they really, really have a need.
 
Reactions
112 0 0
#14
Have you considered a chrome book or windows S? They're highly restrictive environments. Windows S limits you to only running UWP apps from their store, but you could upgrade to windows 10 proper if they really, really have a need.
I suggested both (I have a chromebook as a secondary, just-bumming-around-the-house laptop), but my parents don't really like either the concept of the cloud or not being able to install programs they need from other sources.
 
Top