Bicycles

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#1
Now that both kids can ride and Mr. Wasabi/Aussie has a bike I figure I need to get myself one. The only thing is, there are so many on the market now I don't know what to choose between comfort, hybrid, road bikes, etc. I would be riding on paved roads around my neighborhood and I don't want to spend more than $200-250. It doesn't have to be the best thing out there. If it goes when I pedal that's good.
 
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#2
Biii-cycle. Biii-cycle. Biii-cycle.

I want to ride my bi-CYC-le
I want to ride my biiike.
I want to ride my bi-CYC-le
I want to ride it where I liiike!



Sorry, that's all I have to contribute.
 
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#3
I would say go with a hybrid. Those are best for urban riding, like what I do.

Though I can't really help with specific brands or anything. I would say just go to the local bike shop, tell them what you're looking for the price range, and test some out. If it's a bike shop worth a damn, they'll be very helpful. The nice thing is, if you buy it from a local bike shop, they usually give you a free year of tune-ups, which believe me, comes in handy.
 
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#4
Mr. Z wants to start riding bikes as a family, so we're in the same bike-hunt phase. I've had a few different styles of bikes over the years, but now I just want one built for comfort and simplicity. We'll probably be riding on a similar turf as you (neighborhood, parks, etc.) so I've been looking at beach cruiser. I've also found you're going to have to really sit on them to make a decision, varying seats and frames and all of that.
 
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#5
If there are any hills, or even rolling terrain, where you live get a bike with gears. Beach Cruisers are cool and fun, but completely suck once you get off a boardwalk.
 
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#6
If there are any hills, or even rolling terrain, where you live get a bike with gears. Beach Cruisers are cool and fun, but completely suck once you get off a boardwalk.
I second this. An English 3 speed might even be enough, and still have a similar style. Our just get a hybrid and a nice comfy seat.

I've been on the look out for some old road bikes I can play with and work on recently. Haven't had a ton of luck though.
 
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#7
I second this. An English 3 speed might even be enough, and still have a similar style. Our just get a hybrid and a nice comfy seat.

I've been on the look out for some old road bikes I can play with and work on recently. Haven't had a ton of luck though.
I've got an old 19"-20" Trek that hasn't seen the outside of the shed in nearly 10 years. I doubt I'll ever have the time or funds to get it or me up and running again (lost my helmet, jerseys, and shorts in the fire. Only bike shoes I have are too small now).
 
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#8
Now that both kids can ride and Mr. Wasabi/Aussie has a bike I figure I need to get myself one. The only thing is, there are so many on the market now I don't know what to choose between comfort, hybrid, road bikes, etc. I would be riding on paved roads around my neighborhood and I don't want to spend more than $200-250. It doesn't have to be the best thing out there. If it goes when I pedal that's good.
I'd recommend a 26" Cruiser-style bike. They typically have a relaxed geometry, some gearing, fenders, and a fairly comfortable seat. There are usually a few options through the big box stores in the $90 to $150 range. Schwinn isn't the name it once was, but it is still a pretty good option in this market. A friend of mine, who is a casual cyclist, bought one of these: http://www.walmart.com/ip/Schwinn-Clairmont-26-Men-s-Cruiser-Bike/15711185 a few years ago and hasn't had any issues with it.

Regardless of what bike you buy, if you buy it from a big-box store, I strongly recommend taking the bike to your local bike shop and having them look it over. They will probably have a cheap tune-up option for new chain store bikes. Basically, the tune-up will make sure that the bike is assembled properly and they should be able to spot any issue before they become repairs.
 
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#9
I've got an old 19"-20" Trek that hasn't seen the outside of the shed in nearly 10 years. I doubt I'll ever have the time or funds to get it or me up and running again (lost my helmet, jerseys, and shorts in the fire. Only bike shoes I have are too small now).
If only you lived closer... Right now I'm using a steyr clubman, which is pretty decent. It's in good shape though, so I don't want to tear it all apart. I may end up doing it anyway.
 
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#10
I'd say to get a hybrid bike and put a comfy gel-seat on it. I've only owned mountain bikes (which I don't recommend, at all). My former roommate had a Schwinn Hybrid that was like riding in a smooth Cadillac, compared to my stiff Jeep Wrangler (mtn bike).
 
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#11
If you're just looking for casual biking, you can pick up the sort of bikes they sell at Target. They're cheap, and they act like they're cheap, but if they're going to spend a lot of time falling down, getting left outside, etc, it might be the right thing for just "tooling around the neighborhood." I used to have a nice $1200 Cannondale hard tail, but even though it was an awesome bike, I didn't spend enough time riding it to justify the cost, even though I sold it for almost $600 about 10 years later.

--Patrick
 
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#12
I would still be using the mountain bike I got on my 13th birthday if my gear shifters didn't break on me. Still wondering if I can just get them fixed. :p
 
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#13
I think my price requirement is more out of guilt. My husband's and son's bikes were free from people we knew who were moving. Mentally I can't justify the cost for a bike I'm riding maybe a few times a week when we paid nothing for theirs. I might have to get over that then since I'm thinking a hybrid might be my best bet. There are several bike shops I know of that I can go check out. I've been apprehensive about going since the one I went to in CA made me feel very unwelcome. They catered to the racing/triathlon crowd, not a casual/ general fitness rider.

I hadn't even considered the hills around us since our general vicinity is pretty flat. There are a few hills that are gradual inclines, but steep overall. One in particular used to be the death of me when I was running.
 
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#14
I've been apprehensive about going since the one I went to in CA made me feel very unwelcome. They catered to the racing/triathlon crowd, not a casual/ general fitness rider.
I get that kind of attitude at REI, but there's a locally-owned shop here that's way more friendly. I imagine you've got a lot less options though.
 
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#15
I get that kind of attitude at REI, but there's a locally-owned shop here that's way more friendly. I imagine you've got a lot less options though.
Surprisingly, I can think of 3 locally-owned bike shops that are nearby. I think the size of the island, plus the Ironman triathlon in Kona (and various events here), the military community, and the good weather all make biking a lucrative business. The place I went to in CA was in an upper class neighborhood and I was not their target client.
 
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#21
That is very, very cool. I want, but probably not as badly as you. I'd probably rather see a 300W hub motor, battery pack, and a folding solar cell...
I'd be more into electric bikes if they allowed the bike to charge on downhills and at low cruise, i.e. none of this "outlet or else" charging restriction. Just leave the regenerative braking on at 1-5%, I'm sure the drag on people-powered-pedaling might be noticeable, but not oppressive on the flats.

--Patrick
 
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